SSCCGL English Language And Comprehension

Question 36

You have a passage following with question. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to the given question out of the four alternatives.
Two or three days and nights went by, 1 reckon I might say they swam by they slid along so quiet and smooth and lovely. Here is the way we put it in the time. It was a monstrous big river down there-sometimes a mile and a half wider we ran rights, and laid up and hid daytimes, soon as night was most gone we stopped navigating and tied up nearly always in the dead water under a towhead and then cut young cotton woods and willows and hid the roft with them-Then, we set out the lines. Next we slid into the river and had a swim, so as to freshen up and cool, off then we set down on the sandy bottom where the water was about knee deep and watched the daylight come. Not a sound anywhere-perfectly shill just like the whole word was asleep, only sometimes, the bullfrogs a cluttering maybe. The first thing to see, looking away over the water, was a kind of dull line- that was the woods on other side, you couldn’t make nothing else out, then a pale place in the sky, then more paleness spreading around, then the river softened up away off and warm black any more, but gray you could see little dark spots drifing along ever so far away- rading scowe and such things and long black streaks-rafts sometimes you could hear a sweep creaking, jumbled up voices, it was so still and sounds comes so far and by and by you could see a streak on the water which you know by the look of the streak that there’s snag there in a current which breaks on it and makes that streak look that way.
How did the days and nights go by, according to the writer?

  • They slid along so smooth and soft and quietly

  • They slid along so quietly and smooth and softly

  • They slid along so quiet and smooth and lovely

  • They slid along so smooth and queitly

Solution

C.

They slid along so quiet and smooth and lovely

Question 37

You have a passage following with question. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to the given question out of the four alternatives.
Two or three days and nights went by, 1 reckon I might say they swam by they slid along so quiet and smooth and lovely. Here is the way we put it in the time. It was a monstrous big river down there-sometimes a mile and a half wider we ran rights, and laid up and hid daytimes, soon as night was most gone we stopped navigating and tied up nearly always in the dead water under a towhead and then cut young cotton woods and willows and hid the roft with them-Then, we set out the lines. Next we slid into the river and had a swim, so as to freshen up and cool, off then we set down on the sandy bottom where the water was about knee deep and watched the daylight come. Not a sound anywhere-perfectly shill just like the whole word was asleep, only sometimes, the bullfrogs a cluttering maybe. The first thing to see, looking away over the water, was a kind of dull line- that was the woods on other side, you couldn’t make nothing else out, then a pale place in the sky, then more paleness spreading around, then the river softened up away off and warm black any more, but gray you could see little dark spots drifing along ever so far away- rading scowe and such things and long black streaks-rafts sometimes you could hear a sweep creaking, jumbled up voices, it was so still and sounds comes so far and by and by you could see a streak on the water which you know by the look of the streak that there’s snag there in a current which breaks on it and makes that streak look that way.
They stopped navigating

  • at daytime

  • at dawn

  • at night

  • at dusk

Solution

B.

at dawn

Question 38

You have a passage following with question. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to the given question out of the four alternatives.
Two or three days and nights went by, 1 reckon I might say they swam by they slid along so quiet and smooth and lovely. Here is the way we put it in the time. It was a monstrous big river down there-sometimes a mile and a half wider we ran rights, and laid up and hid daytimes, soon as night was most gone we stopped navigating and tied up nearly always in the dead water under a towhead and then cut young cotton woods and willows and hid the roft with them-Then, we set out the lines. Next we slid into the river and had a swim, so as to freshen up and cool, off then we set down on the sandy bottom where the water was about knee deep and watched the daylight come. Not a sound anywhere-perfectly shill just like the whole word was asleep, only sometimes, the bullfrogs a cluttering maybe. The first thing to see, looking away over the water, was a kind of dull line- that was the woods on other side, you couldn’t make nothing else out, then a pale place in the sky, then more paleness spreading around, then the river softened up away off and warm black any more, but gray you could see little dark spots drifing along ever so far away- rading scowe and such things and long black streaks-rafts sometimes you could hear a sweep creaking, jumbled up voices, it was so still and sounds comes so far and by and by you could see a streak on the water which you know by the look of the streak that there’s snag there in a current which breaks on it and makes that streak look that way.
After a swim in the moor they

  • set down on the sandy shore and watched the daylight come

  • set down on the sandy bottom and watched the daylight come

  • set down on the sandy bottom where the water was about ankle deep and watched the daylight come

  • set down on the sandy bottom where the water was about knee deep and watched the daylight come

Solution

D.

set down on the sandy bottom where the water was about knee deep and watched the daylight come

Question 39

You have a passage following with question. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to the given question out of the four alternatives.
Two or three days and nights went by, 1 reckon I might say they swam by they slid along so quiet and smooth and lovely. Here is the way we put it in the time. It was a monstrous big river down there-sometimes a mile and a half wider we ran rights, and laid up and hid daytimes, soon as night was most gone we stopped navigating and tied up nearly always in the dead water under a towhead and then cut young cotton woods and willows and hid the roft with them-Then, we set out the lines. Next we slid into the river and had a swim, so as to freshen up and cool, off then we set down on the sandy bottom where the water was about knee deep and watched the daylight come. Not a sound anywhere-perfectly shill just like the whole word was asleep, only sometimes, the bullfrogs a cluttering maybe. The first thing to see, looking away over the water, was a kind of dull line- that was the woods on other side, you couldn’t make nothing else out, then a pale place in the sky, then more paleness spreading around, then the river softened up away off and warm black any more, but gray you could see little dark spots drifing along ever so far away- rading scowe and such things and long black streaks-rafts sometimes you could hear a sweep creaking, jumbled up voices, it was so still and sounds comes so far and by and by you could see a streak on the water which you know by the look of the streak that there’s snag there in a current which breaks on it and makes that streak look that way.
In the stillness of the night

  • the whole world was asleep

  • a sweep creaking or jumble up voices could be heard

  • sound come so far

  • the bullfrogs also were asleep

Solution

A.

the whole world was asleep

Question 40

You have a passage following with question. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to the given question out of the four alternatives.
Two or three days and nights went by, 1 reckon I might say they swam by they slid along so quiet and smooth and lovely. Here is the way we put it in the time. It was a monstrous big river down there-sometimes a mile and a half wider we ran rights, and laid up and hid daytimes, soon as night was most gone we stopped navigating and tied up nearly always in the dead water under a towhead and then cut young cotton woods and willows and hid the roft with them-Then, we set out the lines. Next we slid into the river and had a swim, so as to freshen up and cool, off then we set down on the sandy bottom where the water was about knee deep and watched the daylight come. Not a sound anywhere-perfectly shill just like the whole word was asleep, only sometimes, the bullfrogs a cluttering maybe. The first thing to see, looking away over the water, was a kind of dull line- that was the woods on other side, you couldn’t make nothing else out, then a pale place in the sky, then more paleness spreading around, then the river softened up away off and warm black any more, but gray you could see little dark spots drifing along ever so far away- rading scowe and such things and long black streaks-rafts sometimes you could hear a sweep creaking, jumbled up voices, it was so still and sounds comes so far and by and by you could see a streak on the water which you know by the look of the streak that there’s snag there in a current which breaks on it and makes that streak look that way.
The streak on the water looks as it does because

  • of a sang there in the swift current which breaks on it

  • the streak has been swept by the swift current

  • the swift current has broken the streak

  • the streak has been swept by the swift current to the shore

Solution

A.

of a sang there in the swift current which breaks on it